Sunday, 12 December 2010

December 1767

We have had a very severe frost and deep snow this month. My


thermometer was one day fourteen degrees and a half below the


freezing point, within doors. The tender evergreens were injured


pretty much. It was very providential that the air was still, and the


ground well covered with snow, else vegetation in general must


have suffered prodigiously. There is reason to believe that some


days were more severe than any since the year 1739-40.

Gilbert White

The winter of 1739 sounds even tougher - It was called The Great Frost :

http://www.londononline.co.uk/history/thames/5/

We have more snow and frost predicted for the end of the week...

Tuesday, 7 December 2010

Is it or isn't it?

Further cold weather this winter is possible if the current Atlantic high pressure system that is trapping sub-tropical air and preventing it from reaching Europe stays put or goes away and returns.  While the severity could be exacerbated if current arctic sea ice levels continue to remain low, according to one climate scientist.
Britain's Meteorological Office forecasts that the cold snap affecting northern Europe will continue for the next week or so, according to a Met Office spokesman.  "Much of December looks like being on the cold side," commented Met Office chief forecaster Ewen McCallum

or
There is “no evidence” that the Gulf Stream is slowing down at the moment, according to Vicky Pope, Head of Climate Change for Government at the UK Meteorological Office.  A report by the Met Office released at the Cancun climate change conference stated that improved observations cast doubt on previously reported evidence of a recent slow down in the Gulf Stream which keeps northern Europe warmer than it would otherwise be.